Most Common Equine Breeding Disputes and How to Resolve Them

Disputes are unfortunately common in the equine world, due to the fact that horses involve so much money and responsibility. Every industry, whether it’s hunter/jumper, Thoroughbred racing, roping, dressage, or another discipline, involves breeding which are one of the most common equine disputes that horse lawyers face. Below are three of the most common breeding disputes along with equine legal solutions:

The stallion’s show of race schedule limits its availability for breeding
The stallion must be available for collection, whether it’s live cover, AL, or shipped cooled semen. This problem can be avoided by creating a contract with an equine lawyer that specifies a range of dates in which the stallion can be available

 

Diseases and hereditary conditions are present
Because the health of the stallion can affect the health of the mare, her offspring, and even the farm in which the mare resides, breeding contracts are necessary to ensure that the stallion is in good health. Horses can carry diseases and conditions that can be spread or passed along to offspring such as
HERDA (Hereditary Equine Regional Dermal Asthenia), HYPP (Hyperkalemic Periodic Paralysis), LWS (Lethal White Syndrome), or OLWS (Overo Lethal White Syndrome). By involving a contract, the stallion’s owner promises that none of these conditions are present after testing.

The foal dies shortly after birth
It’s custom in the equine industry that most breeding contracts offer a “Live Foal Guarantee.” This phrase generates different expectations among owners, managers, and breeders which is why the contract should be worded as specifically as possible to avoid any misunderstandings. For example, the contract should state specially “a single foal that can stand and nurse” or “a foal that survives for 24 hours,” etc.

All of these disputes are easily resolved by clear, reliable, and concisely worded contracts. When entering an equine breeding transaction, it’s important to contact an equine lawyer regardless of whether you’re an owner, manager, or buyer to ensure that your contract covers all important aspects and protects you and your horse.

Disputes are unfortunately common in the equine world, due to the fact that horses involve so much money and responsibility. Every industry, whether it’s hunter/jumper, Thoroughbred racing, roping, dressage, or another discipline, involves breeding which are one of the most common equine disputes that horse lawyers face. Below are three of the most common breeding disputes along with equine legal solutions:

1. The stallion’s show or race schedule prevents its availability for breeding

The stallion must be available for collection, whether it’s live cover, AI, or shipped cooled semen. This problem can be avoided by creating a contract with an equine lawyer that specifies a range of dates in which the stallion can be available.

2. Diseases and hereditary conditions are present
Because the health of the stallion can affect the health of the mare, her offspring, and even the farm in which the mare resides, breeding contracts are necessary to ensure that the stallion is in good health. Horses can carry diseases and conditions that can be spread or passed along to offspring such as
HERDA (Hereditary Equine Regional Dermal Asthenia), HYPP (Hyperkalemic Periodic Paralysis), LWS (Lethal White Syndrome), or OLWS (Overo Lethal White Syndrome). By involving a contract, the stallion’s owner promises that none of these conditions are present after testing.

3. The foal dies shortly after birth
It’s custom in the equine industry that most breeding contracts offer a “Live Foal Guarantee.” This phrase generates different expectations among owners, managers, and breeders which is why the contract should be worded as specifically as possible to avoid any misunderstandings. For example, the contract should state specially “a single foal that can stand and nurse” or “a foal that survives for 24 hours,” etc.

All of these disputes are easily resolved by clear, reliable, and concisely worded contracts. When entering an equine breeding transaction, it’s important to contact an equine lawyer regardless of whether you’re an owner, manager, or buyer to ensure that your contract covers all important aspects and protects you and your horse.

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